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The Authority of the Test Page


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CHAPTER 1: The Infallibility of the Test Page


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The link below to the next chapter has a nifty roll-over effect.

Here’s an example of a quote from a Christadelphian source:

SALVATION depends upon the assimilation of the mind to the divine ideas, principles, and affections, exhibited in the Scriptures. This process commences with a belief of the Gospel, but it is by no means completed thereby; it takes a lifetime for its scope, and untiring diligence for its accomplishment. The mind is naturally alien from God and all His ideas (Romans 8:7; 1 Corinthians 2:14), and cannot be brought at once to the divine likeness. This is a work of slow development, and can only be achieved by the industrious application of the individual to the expression of God’s mind in the Scriptures of truth. The infallible advice then to every man and woman anxious about their salvation is—READ THE SCRIPTURES DAILY. It is only in proportion as this is done, that success may be looked for. The man who sows sparingly in this respect, will only reap sparingly. Much spiritual fructification is only to be realised in connection with fructifying influences of the Spirit in the Word. To enable Bible readers conveniently to carry out the suggestion of the foregoing remarks, the following tables are placed in their hands, under the guidance of which their daily readings will be methodical and edifying. By strict adherence to this plan from year to year, the reader will reap much profit, gradually losing the insipidity of the natural mind, and taking on the warm and exalted tone of the Spirit’s teaching, which qualifies for the inheritance of the Saints in light.

Here’s an example of a quote from the Bible:

1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. 2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters. 3 And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day. 6 And God said, “Let there be a vault between the waters to separate water from water.” 7 So God made the vault and separated the water under the vault from the water above it. And it was so. 8 God called the vault “sky.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the second day. 9 And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. 10 God called the dry ground “land,” and the gathered waters he called “seas.” And God saw that it was good. 11 Then God said, “Let the land produce vegetation: seed-bearing plants and trees on the land that bear fruit with seed in it, according to their various kinds.” And it was so. 12 The land produced vegetation: plants bearing seed according to their kinds and trees bearing fruit with seed in it according to their kinds. And God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening, and there was morning—the third day.

1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. 2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters. 3 And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day. 6 And God said, “Let there be a vault between the waters to separate water from water.” 7 So God made the vault and separated the water under the vault from the water above it. And it was so. 8 God called the vault “sky.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the second day. 9 And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. 10 God called the dry ground “land,” and the gathered waters he called “seas.” And God saw that it was good. 11 Then God said, “Let the land produce vegetation: seed-bearing plants and trees on the land that bear fruit with seed in it, according to their various kinds.” And it was so. 12 The land produced vegetation: plants bearing seed according to their kinds and trees bearing fruit with seed in it according to their kinds. And God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening, and there was morning—the third day.

Here’s an example of a quote from some other source:​

“There was considerable credal flexibility amongst the Baptised Believers, especially in the period before Robert Roberts became editor of The Ambassador of the Coming Agediminishing between 1864 and the death of John Thomas, much less between 1871 and the Inspiration Division (see Chapter V), and hardly at all after 1885. In the earliest of these periods, this credal flexibility concerned doctrine as well as ecclesiastical procedures. William Norrie’s Early History is replete with references to a wide variety of liturgical practices, ecclesial officers’ titles and functions, the organisation of services, the titles by which the ‘ecclesias’ were known, the credal formulae they accepted, the use to which such creeds were put, the practice of re-immersion upon a deeper understanding of the gospel, and the attitude to practical matters such as politics and insurance policies. Local minutes, ecclesial record books, ecclesial rule books, letters and other surviving documents fully support the picture as presented by Norrie. This picture of diversity was not reflected, for example, in the 58 chapters on this period of Christadelphian history written by Robert Roberts in Life Dr. T., and MDAMW. The Christadelphian past tended, here, to be written rather in the manner of the Whig historians.


















































































VIEW THE MIND MAP

PAGE VISITS FROM 16/09/13

UnBELIEVABLE

THE TRINITY HURDLE

NOVEL: HOLY BIBLE

Christadelphian Quotes

You lay a great stress upon facts throughout your letters, and are incessant in your demand that I should attend to them. This is good; but facts have to be rightly put together, and then you must have all the facts. I do not think you put the facts rightly together, and you leave out some, I am sure.

(Robert Roberts, a Christadelphian Pioneer, quoted

by Ruth McHaffie in Brethren Indeed)

The Spirit of liberty, based upon the law of faith, is the Spirit of Christ; and this spirit all the Sons of God are privileged to possess, and having it, to breathe. I claim the right of exercising this privilege, as well as my contemporaries; and I require of them that they should do to me as once they loudly required others to do to them…

(written by John Thomas, the founder of the Christadelphians, when he was against creeds in 

The Apostolic Advocate magazine, August 1836)

(John Thomas, from Apostacy Unveiled, p. 137,

quoted in The Christadelphian Magazine, January 1906)

Must a man never progress? If he discovers an error in his premises, must he for ever hold to it for the sake of consistency? May such a calamity never befall me! Rather let me change every day, till I get right at last.

(from a letter written by John Thomas in 1848, quoted by Robert Roberts, in Dr. Thomas: His Life and Work)

Do what is right; be valiant for the Truth; teach it without compromise, and all lovers of the Truth will approve you. For all others you need not care a rush!

(from a letter written by John Thomas to Robert Roberts and published in The Christadelphian magazine, February 1866)

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